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Monday, 06 April 2020 00:00

Sesamoiditis may occur when the two sesamoid bones in the foot become inflamed, typically due to an injury. Repeated trauma or pressure placed on the ball of the foot is a common reason for this condition to develop. Dancers and basketball players are more likely to develop sesamoiditis due to the nature of their sport and the pressure often placed on the ball of the foot. For your sesamoids to recover it is imperative to reduce that pressure. Some ways to alleviate the pressure on the balls of your feet are by using foot inserts, a hot and cold foot roller, or metatarsal pads. For professional advice and a proper diagnosis, it’s suggested that you speak with a podiatrist.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Leonora Fihman, DPM of California. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Encino, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Monday, 30 March 2020 00:00

There is a small bone that can be found on the outside, near the middle of the foot. This is referred to as the cuboid bone, which is attached to the heel bone by ligaments. If the tissues surrounding the cuboid bone become injured, the medical condition that is known as cuboid syndrome may develop. A common symptom that is generally associated with this condition may consist of pain and discomfort on the outside of the foot, which may then spread to the toes. The affected area may become swollen, and make it difficult to walk on uneven surfaces. Additionally, limping may become a natural method of dispersing some of the body’s weight. This condition may be caused by enduring an ankle injury, or if the patient has flat feet. Moderate relief may be found if the affected foot is elevated, as this may help to reduce a portion of the swelling. If you have these types of symptoms, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Leonora Fihman, DPM from California. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Encino, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

Blisters may develop on your feet as a means to help protect your body’s tissues. They are fluid filled sacs that will typically drain on their own. They can however, be incredibly uncomfortable.  Blisters may form due to friction when the skin is rubbing against the inside of the shoes, especially in footwear that is too tight. They are more likely to develop when the weather is warmer, since the skin of the feet get sweatier and softer, making it more susceptible to damage. To help prevent a blister, it is suggested that you shop towards the end of the day, when your feet are at their largest, that way you can avoid buying shoes that are too small. Make sure you are also fitting shoes to your feet, not just going by the size you see. It may also help to focus on wearing footwear that is made of breathable, light, and flexible material for ultimate comfort. If you tend to develop blisters easily, it’s also suggested to look into shoes with anti-friction padding. For more advice on how to prevent and treat blisters, it’s suggested that you seek the professional care of a podiatrist.

Blisters may appear as a single bubble or in a cluster. They can cause a lot of pain and may be filled with pus, blood, or watery serum. If your feet are hurting, contact Leonora Fihman, DPM of California. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters are often the result of friction. This happens due to the constant rubbing from shoes, which can lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

Symptoms

(Blister symptoms may vary depending on what is causing them)

  • Bubble of skin filled with fluid
  • Redness
  • Moderate to severe pain
  • Itching

Prevention & Treatment

In order to prevent blisters, you should be sure to wear comfortable shoes with socks that cushion your feet and absorb sweat. Breaking a blister open may increase your chances of developing an infection. However, if your blister breaks, you should wash the area with soap and water immediately and then apply a bandage to the affected area. If your blisters cause severe pain it is important that you call your podiatrist right away.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Encino, CA. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Blisters
Thursday, 19 March 2020 00:00

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